Thyroid 101-Part 3

Hello everyone! So after knowing all about Hashimoto disease, the immune system and autoimmune diseases, today I will try to sum up ways to reboot your body, give your immune system the boost it needs to be able to do its job properly, and hopefully ways of getting your thyroid back to functioning properly and for your body to finally stop attacking your cells.

So let’s start from the liver, as we saw here, liver is what converts your T4 into T3, and so if your liver isn’t working properly, this won’t be done and therefore, you will have a malfunctioning thyroid gland. So let’s look deeper into ways of supporting your liver. The liver’s main job is to detoxify your blood before passing it to the rest of the body. It is constantly dealing with chemicals and harmful substances, to make sure your body is pure and toxin free. In order to support your liver, giving it some kind of break from time to time is a great idea. How to do that? Here are few tips:

 

  • Avoid alcohol and caffeine
  • Try to have a healthy diet as much as you can
  • Make sure you minimize the use of medication, because your liver is responsible of analyzing synthetics and passing them to the blood.
  • Exercise regularly.
  • From time to time stop eating the following items, not because they are all harmful, some are very good for you indeed, but because it is your liver that is responsible of their digestion, so in order to lightens the liver’s workload it is a good idea to stop eating the following foods for a week or 10 days each season: Eggs, tomatoes, grapefruits, gluten-containing products, soy and soy products, peanut and peanut butter, Tuna, shellfish, milk, cheese, cooking cream, margarine, butter, soda and soft drinks, white or brown sugar, chocolate, ketchup, and corn.
  • On the other hand you might want to increase your intake of the following foods: Avocadoes, apples, bananas, apples, berries, grapes, kiwis, nectarines, papaya, peaches, plums, strawberries, artichokes, asparagus, arugula, bell pepper, cucumber, eggplants, squash, peas, radishes, yams, mushrooms, lettuce, okra, zucchinis, spinach, legumes including lentils and peas, almonds, macadamia nuts, walnuts, cashews, milk substitutes such as rice and almond milk, olive and coconut oils, all fresh and frozen fish (except shellfish and Tuna) wild is better than farmed of course.
  • Reduce stress!!!!! I can not stress enough on that (how ironic is this sentence lol). Indulge in sports that focus on breathing such as Yoga, Tai Chi and Qigong. Try to get enough sleep (8 to 10 hours if you can, or just as close to that as you can). Try to listen to calm, and meditative music in the car, make sure you spread meals throughout your day not to put the body under unnecessary stress and just avoid stressful situations.
  • Start your day with some warm water and lemon juice (Juice half a lemon, add half cup of warm water and drink it first thing in the morning). Lemon is truly magical, it acts like a natural cleanser and helps the liver gets rid of the toxins.

 

Now that we made sure the liver is well supported let’s move to your gut’s health. As explained here, your immune system is strongly linked to your guts, so keeping healthy guts is essential in having a healthy immune system. How do you do that? Follow these steps:

 

  • Increase your intake of fiber and fermented food like yogurt, kim chi, sauerkraut…etc.
  • Consider probiotic supplements
  • Avoid using antibiotics as they kill all kind of good bacteria in your guts
  • Stock up on anti-inflammatory foods such us spinach, kale, walnuts, almonds…etc.
  • Eat less refined sugar
  • and of course lower your stress levels.

 

Now let’s talk specifically on how to improve the health of your thyroid gland.

 

The first thing you should start doing is test your TSH, if it is high, you will need to take your thyroxin medication religiously, to adjust your TSH, as we will need to first stabilize your situation then look into getting better.

 

Then consider getting your Iodine, Magnesium, and Vitamin D levels tested. You would also want to check your liver function too, a very simple blood test can do that, because if you remember, liver is what converts T4 to T3. You might want to also test you RT3 (reverse T3, which is what your liver produce instead of R3 to get rid of unwanted and unneeded T4). Your doctor might not agree to do all these tests, (because again, no doctor in this island wants to spend more than 5 minutes with each patient), but if your insurance will cover the cost then please insist.

 

After getting all the needed tests, now it is time to strengthen the Thyroid gland, and the production of the T4 and T3. Consider adding some supplements into your diet, such as: Selenium. Selenium is a very important ingredient in the conversion of T4 into a T3. However, unfortunately it is not easily found in food, or if found it will be in very little quantities, that will not really help the body. Also some selenium rich foods are also rich in mold, or are not recommended if your thyroid isn’t working well (like Soy products and wheat). So you really have to be careful when it comes to this mineral. To stay in the safe side, take supplements that you can find over the counter. Here are some selenium rich foods however: Eggs, Mushrooms, Oats, Tuna, Sunflower seeds, Salmon, Brown rice …etc.

  • Increase your good fats daily intake, as well as zinc, vitamin A, B, and D.
  • Consider getting checked for other autoimmune diseases like Celiac.
  • Avoid mold in whatever form it is, whether it is in your house or in the coffee you have in your mug.
  • Avoid toxins, by being careful in what utensils you use in the kitchen, avoid plastic, stainless-steel. Use cast iron pots, and wooden tools instead. Drink plenty of water. Let your body sweat as much as you can (the best way to get rid of toxins) so don’t hold back in using Saunas, and hot baths.  Try to not use your phone at least at night, in your bedroom, either switch it off, or put in on airplane mode.  Avoid all the wireless devices as much as you can. And of course avoid SUGAR!
  • Finally, I can’t stress enough about exercising, getting enough sleep and avoiding stress!

 

 

I personally advice to get your TSH tested after you do all the above changes, every 2, 3 months, just to check if you need medication and if the dosage is right. If you follow all the protocols above, I guarantee you that you will boost your thyroid function, and if you won’t get a 100% results you will at least manage to reduce your medication’s dosage, as well as the inflammation in your body.

 

I really hope these three blog posts (this one you are reading now, this and this) will help you get your life back, and that you manage to finally get your body to function the way it should.

 

Many healthy vibes from me to you.

 

Ouiam

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thyroid 101 -Part 2-

 

 

A little late but as promised, this is the second part of Thyroid 101. Today I would like to talk about autoimmune diseases. An autoimmune disease develops when your immune system, which defends your body against diseases, decides your healthy cells are foreign. As a result, your immune system attacks healthy cells. An autoimmune disease can affect one or many different types of body tissue, depending on the type. It can also cause abnormal organ growth and changes in organ function. There are over 80 types of autoimmune diseases, with many many symptoms that can very much go unnoticed. The tricky part is that whenever the organ being attacked by your immune system is completely damaged, the immune system then moves to attacking another healthy organ, and so it is a never ending circle of damaging healthy cells, organs, and tissues. Which also means a never ending series of symptoms such as anxiety, depression, digestive issues, heart disease, sleep disorders, weight gain, problems with memory and concentration…etc

Before we go deeper into autoimmune diseases, let’s first learn a thing or two about the immune system itself:

1-Your immune system protects against diseases, infection, and helps you recover after an injury.  Having a fever and inflammation can be unpleasant, but they are signs that your body is doing its job. Fever releases white blood cells, increases metabolism, and stops certain organisms from multiplying. Inflammation occurs when each damaged cell releases histamines. The histamines cause the cell walls to dilate. This creates the redness, heat, pain, and swelling of inflammation. As a result, your body limits the effects of the irritant.

2- Your immune system and gut health are inextricably linked. Did you know that approximately seventy to eighty percent of your immune tissue is located within your digestive system? The gut is often the first entry point for exposure to pathogens (bad bacteria and virus’ that can cause disease). The digestive system comprises of cells, proteins, tissues and organs which work together in a complex way to defend the body against harmful bacteria, infectious diseases and toxins. A variety of illnesses can occur when these protective functions of the gut are compromised. So your gut immune system needs to be thriving and healthy in order to avoid illness.

3- Stress damages your immune system: Your immune system is ready for anything you can throw at it. But it can only handle so much. Stress has a significant effect on your immune system. During stress, a series of events release cortisol, adrenaline, and other stress hormones from the adrenal gland. Together they help your body cope with stress. Normally, cortisol is helpful because it decreases the inflammation in the body that results from the immune responses caused by stress. But if a person is chronically stressed, stress hormones can affect the way the body functions over time. It can also cause different autoimmune disease, or make them worse if it is a preexisting condition.

 

Now let’s move to Hashimoto’s disease, which is one of the many wildly known autoimmune diseases. Hashimoto’s affects women more than men, suggesting that the progesterone and estrogen hormones may play a role. Furthermore, some women have thyroid problems during the first year after having a baby. Although the problem usually goes away, some of these women may develop Hashimoto’s years later.

It is very difficult to diagnose Hashimoto’s, because it takes years before your Thyroid gland is damaged and your TSH level is high enough to alarm your doctor. You might suffer silently for years, from chronic fatigue, depression, weight gain, paleness or puffiness of the face, joint and muscle pain constipation, inability to get warm, difficulty getting pregnant, joint and muscle pain hair loss or thinning, brittle hair, irregular or heavy menstrual periods, slowed heart rate, and many more ugly symptoms that can turn your life upside down.

While doctors can prescribe the synthetic version of T4, like Levothyroxine, and this will enhance your overall health, however, it will not solve the problem. Your immune system is busy attacking your own Thyroid gland, and so even though the prescribed medications are helping with the symptoms, the source of the problem is still there. Your immune system will keep on attacking your thyroid gland, till it is completely damaged, then it will move to another organ. That’s why Hashimoto’s is strongly linked with Addison’s disease, Graves’ disease, premature ovarian failure, type 1 diabetes, lupus erythematosus (a disorder that causes inflammation in a number of the body’s systems, including the lungs and heart), pernicious anemia (a disorder that prevents the absorption of vitamin B12), rheumatoid arthritis, thrombocytopenic purpura (a disorder that interferes with the blood’s ability to clot), vitiligo (a disorder that produces white patches on the skin due to attacks on skin pigment cells). So even if you are taking your medication religiously, you are still at risk.

If you want to know more about how to survive your Hashimoto, live a normal life, risk free (whether you have Hashimoto’s or another autoimmune disease), stay tuned to my next blog post, where I will talk about natural remedies, and simple changes you can do in your diet and lifestyle that can help you greatly.

 

Ouiam

 

 

 

 

 

Thyroid 101 -Part 1-

Last week I made an appointment with a doctor to check up my thyroid levels, something I do about twice a year, since I have stopped taking medicine – I have had a hypothyroid for the last 18 years, and have been on Levothyroxine, until a couple years ago, when I got myself into the right lifestyle, made tons of research and learnt more about my condition and how to bio hack my own body, here is a little post I wrote about how I managed to get off medicine, last year. If you know me, you would definitely know that I don’t necessarily hold a soft spot on my heart for doctors….! I would never go see one unless I REALLY have to, for something major. I do however go twice a year to an endocrinologist to ask for some blood work. I know what I am looking for exactly, so I ask him to prescribe specific blood tests, I do the blood work, ask for the results to be emailed to me and that’s it. This time the endocrinologist I usually go to (who is fairly good, listens to me and tries his best to have a more holistic view that fits me and my philosophy), this doctor was on leave so I did a random google search, and came up with a random name. I figured since I only need specific blood tests that I can ask for, it should be fine. So I go to see this doctor, I tell him about my history with my hypothyroid, and I ask him for the following tests:

TSH

T3

T4

RT3

Antibodies

Iodine

And as I am getting ready to say my last required test (Vitamin D), he interrupts me, saying one word, that leaves me astonished! He said: “NO”!!!

Yes, he actually said NO!! he refused to write down those tests I have asked for, and said that a simple TSH blood test would be more than enough. He actually even had the guts to tell me that this was “ancient medicine” and that no one does those tests anymore! I really couldn’t wrap my head around what was going on! What the heck?!! I have lived with my Hypothyroid for the last 18 years! I have Hashimoto’s thyroiditis disease- which is actually an autoimmune disease- so how is testing for antibodies ancient medicine when it’s an autoimmune disease that we are talking about?!!! I tried to be as kind as I could (and believe me it wasn’t an easy task; no one wants to deal with an arrogant doctor!!) I thanked him for his opinion, and said that I would be more comfortable if he did write those specific tests for me….He still refused! It’s not as if he were to pay from his own pocket, and even if he was worried about my own pocket, he knew that my insurance will cover the costs, so why not!???? I knew then that our conversation was hopeless, so I thanked him for his time and left his office swearing that I NEEDED to write another post about Thyroid, inflammation and hormones, so women who also suffer from their thyroid malfunction can understand their conditions better, and know exactly what they need to deal with in order to have a normal life. So today I will start a mini-series of posts about the Thyroid gland, how it works, how to fix the root problem and not just the symptoms, and how to have a normal life even with a malfunctioning thyroid.

 

Usually whenever you go to see an endocrinologist, for anything related to your thyroid, they would ask for a TSH blood test.  TSH (Thyroid Stimulating Hormone) blood test is used to check for thyroid gland problems. TSH is produced when the hypothalamus releases a substance called thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH). TRH then triggers the pituitary gland to release TSH. TSH causes the thyroid gland to make two hormones: triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4). T3 and T4 help control your body’s metabolism. In other terms, it is the hormone that tells the Thyroid gland that it should work (less or more depending on the body’s needs). Now let’s see how it works:

T3 and T4 are needed for normal growth of the brain, especially during the first 3 years of life. A baby whose thyroid gland does not make enough thyroid hormone (congenital hypothyroidism) may, in severe cases, be mentally retarded. Older children also need thyroid hormones to grow and develop normally. Now that we know these two essential hormones, let’s talk about how they function in our body:

 

The function of the thyroid gland is to take iodine found in many foods, and convert it into thyroid hormones: T4 and T3. Thyroid cells are the only cells in the body which can absorb iodine. These cells combine iodine and the amino acid tyrosine to make T3 and T4. T3 and T4 are then released into the blood stream and are transported throughout the body, where they control metabolism (conversion of oxygen and calories to energy).

Every cell in the body depends upon thyroid hormones for regulation of their metabolism. The normal thyroid gland produces about 80% T4 and about 20% T3, however, T3 possesses about four times the hormone “strength” as T4. So while a very small amount of T3 is produced by the Thyroid gland, the rest of the T3 is produced in a different way. The liver finishes up the thyroid gland’s job, by converting T4 to T3. However, in order to convert T4 to T3, the enzyme 5’- Deiodinase is required, and to activate this enzyme some minerals are needed such as: Selenium.

 

So, in order to determine if you have a functioning Thyroid gland or not, the process is much more complex than just having ONE blood test done. And that’s JUST the Thyroid itself, without even talking about Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, which is an autoimmune disease, and needs many other tests to detect it, other than the famous TSH blood test.

 

In my next post we will talk in details about Hashimoto, and other autoimmune disease related to the Thyroid gland, then on a third post I will be talking about how nutrition CAN reverse many autoimmune diseases if done right.

 

Almost 90% of the women I know are suffering silently from a hypothyroid, which is a disease that sucks life out of you, and turns you into someone you don’t want to be. It is strongly linked to depression, Lupus, infertility, and many other autoimmune diseases. While doctors only want to cover the symptoms by prescribing a synthetic version of T4 (such as Levothyroxine), the inflammation will still be there destroying every ounce of your thyroid gland, then move to destroy other vital organs. And if your liver isn’t doing a good job converting T4 into T3, you will still have a malfunctioning Thyroid gland even if you are taking your prescribed medicine. Therefore, it is crucial to fix the underlying problem rather than treating the symptoms only.

Stay tuned for Thyroid 101 (Part 2)

 

Ouiam

 

Some Serious Pampering at Argan Day Spa…

I am always up for trying new, exciting things, so when Argan Day Spa contacted me to try their services, of course I happily obliged.

I headed there not knowing what to expect, however I was super excited to know that one of the services booked for me was: A Moroccan bath!! I am Moroccan and I obviously know a thing or two about Moroccan baths, so I had very high expectation. However, my concerns were soothed knowing that the owner herself was Moroccan. I arrived to the Spa around 1pm, headed straight to their steam room, guided by a lovely Thai lady, with a gorgeous smile.

Basically a Moroccan Hammam (bath) is a bathroom with steam, where you can bathe, and scrub the hell out of your dead skin, using a glove that feels a bit like sandpaper. After applying the famous Moroccan natural soap, and leaving it for few minutes. You can then later resume your normal showering habits as usual (Soap, shampoo, conditioner …etc).

Once I got to the steam room, I immediately felt like I was back in time to when I was 5 or 6 years old, when I used to go with my mom every week to the “Hammam”. The lady applied the Moroccan soap so gently and I could smell the beautiful and natural smell of that fabulous soap. She then left the room and said that she will come back in 10 minutes, leaving me to relax with the steam to open up my pores. Once she was back, with her black glove, she got right into it. If you have never had a Moroccan Bath, you might be shocked and degusted with whatever is coming out of your body, but there is something absolutely satisfying about it: All the dead skin is gone forever, and you will feel so light and clean like you never had before. The tricky part is to know how much pressure you should apply when rubbing, you don’t want to be too soft, then nothing will come out, and at the same time you don’t want to be too harsh and hurt the skin. The lady who was taking care of me was so perfect that I had to ask her where did she learn all that from. To my surprise, she said that the Owner herself -Miss Fatima Hanine-, has personally trained her, along with the other ladies in the spa! Now that’s a fantastic sense of commitment!

She then washed my hair gently and applied a body mask that is very popular in Morocco, which consists of natural clay and rose water. It smells divine and feels like silk over the body.

Basically you just lay on a table and there is a wonderful lady who takes you on a full journey to Morocco to experience the real deal! She will blow your senses away! and believe me once done you will be addicted to this sort of natural, traditional yet luxurious and dazzling experience.

I then was taken to the massage room, where “Masha” was so warm and helpful- Please remember this name because I can’t recommend her enough!!- After I told her that my calves were very painful, (from all the standing, running, walking I do all day, everyday!), she said she will focus on them. She applied some pressure for few minutes, a little strong but she promised that this will help with the stiff muscles at the back of my legs. Once done I could already feel how light my calves were, and the pain was totally gone! It was such a blessing to finally walk without feeling that the muscles in my legs were going to explode!

After she finished she brought warm towels and washed away all the oil from the massage on my body. How amazing is that! I always hate to have to put back on my clothes, to an oily body, but this time I didn’t have to, there was no trace of oil, just a bunch of happy rejuvenated muscles! She also washed her hands before dealing with my super clean hair.. BONUS!!

I then headed to the salon, to blow dry my hair. Michele was so gentle and super quick, she finished my hair in less than 20 minutes, and it looked great. The Mani-Pedi station is next to the hair area, for now, but starting next month though the whole hair station will be moved to a new extension of the salon- that is currently ready and just being decorated- to fit the high demands of the salon. Also the owner –Miss Fatima- explained that because her main aim is to offer the clients the fabulous experience they deserve when they come to her Salon, she wants the treatment rooms to be as far away from the hair station as possible, so that there is absolutely no trace of disturbance in the air, hence the new extension of the salon was created.

There is also a whole section for men, that includes Mani-Pedi stations, Treatment rooms (massages and facials), and a hair section. Couples can book adjacent rooms that can be opened during the treatment so that they both enjoy the experience together.

For women into fashion, you can also find a wide range of stylish, colorful and very beautiful Moroccan dresses (Kaftans), designed by Miss Fatima herself and made specially in Morocco for her clients.

My experience was exactly what I have hoped for, exactly what every woman deserves. The service is fabulous, the owner herself takes care of the salon, so she makes sure everything is up to standard, which I admire greatly.

The Spa has been open since the beginning of 2013, at the lagoon-Amwaj, (Gate 7&8, First Floor).

For appointments you can call them: 16030888

Follow them: @argandayspa

 

Ouiam

 

Don’t Let Your Hypo-Thyroid Win!!!

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Today I thought I would do something different, I will share with you my daily routine, which is something I don’t usually like to do, because I don’t feel that it is something worth posting and sharing with everyone, and I almost feel ridiculous now writing a whole post about it, but there is a story behind why I am doing it now and I will share it with you. Few days ago, I met a beautiful lady, in her early forties. She was smart, kind and very charming, yet there was something in her eyes that didn’t match with the bubbly person I had in front of me. She looked sad, tired, sleep deprived, but mostly sad. So I gathered my courage and asked her: “So, how are you doing? How are you doing REALLY?”, she then told me her story about the daily struggle with her health. She suffered from a Hypo-Thyroid, and adrenal fatigue –both manifest together most of the time- She felt tired all the time, she woke up more tired than when she went to bed, she couldn’t focus on her work, she couldn’t take care of her kids, and home the way she wanted to. She was stressed all the time. So when I told her that I, too, have a hypo-thyroid, she nearly fell off her chair, not believing what I have just told her, because she thought I couldn’t possibly have a hypo-thyroid and lead the life I led. Because I am always active and busy, no one ever thinks that I actually do have a hypo-thyroid, and that’s exactly why I decided to share my routine today! To tell every woman who reads this post: “YES YOU CAN DO IT TOO!”

 

I was first diagnosed with a hypo-thyroid when I was about 12 years old, I was put on medication straight away (a low dose, but they still were synthetics that I was putting in my body, luckily I no longer take them!). I was always thin, never struggled with my weight, and never really showed any symptoms, it was a pure coincidence that we found out about it this early.

 

Suffering from a hypo-thyroid changes your whole life, it is a condition that will suck the life out of you, it will drain you and turn you into a potato couch (which can’t even be an option when you are a mother!). Luckily I found a way to live with it as peacefully as can be, without losing my energy, and without slowing down my productivity. So this is how my day goes by:

 

I wake up at 5am every single day, and go for my Taichi class which starts at 6am. Before leaving home I would eat a grapefruit (unless I am doing a liver cleanse), 1 date, and 3 walnuts. I then head to Juffair, where I train with my Chinese master “Shao”-a very inspiring lady, to whom I should dedicate a whole post just to talk about how amazing she is! We do our Taichi or Qi Gong forms, depending on how we feel that day. We take small breaks to have some of her exquisite teas, which is always something I look forward to! We wrap up the session at 7:30am, and then I head back home.

 

Adam usually wakes up at 8am, so just in time for me to get back home, take a quick shower and get ready for the day. We then have our breakfast together. Fruits are a must! Always 3 different fruits-carbs-  and some protein (eggs, oats, quinoa…), and some good fats (avocados, olives or olive oil, almond butter with coconut oil that I make myself, nuts…etc.). I usually avoid wheat and gluten, so I make my own bread, the old-fashioned way, like my mom and grandmother did (I use my hands, no machines). I only use whole grain flour (quinoa, rye, millet…etc.).

 

After breakfast, it is “work-time”, Adam and I head to our work area, and we start our lesson for the day. I usually prepare the lessons on weekends and every night I just lay the material to be used the next day on the table, so we don’t waste time. I will talk more about our homeschooling in another post. We are done by 11:30am and just have a chance to get Adam a snack before he takes his nap.

 

This is usually my lunch time, never later than 1pm, because I never want my body to stress about food, which in turn will stress my thyroid, so I always make sure that I eat every two hours or so. I am vegetarian, so my lunch always consists of an ancient grain like Quinoa, couscous, or Burghul, with some carbs (vegetables mostly), and always always some sort of good fats component. I then get the chance to finish any work I have (Blogging, writing, reading… etc.)

 

 

When Adam wakes up, it’s his lunch time, and then we head out, always to do something fun, with friends or just the two of us. I try to plan outings and meet-ups with other moms of toddlers so the kids can socialize and explore new things together, while we-moms- are enjoying ourselves too!

 

I always take some healthy snacks for Adam and I, wherever we go. Some fruits, vegetables, or nuts. This way we are both happy and satiated.

 

Dinner is at 6:30pm for Adam, while I will usually have the carbs of my dinner first (vegetables), and will get to part two of it after putting Adam to sleep. This way I will avoid that 6pm crash that happens because of the decrease in the amount of cortisol in your body, and still enjoy a peaceful dinner an hour later. Dinner is usually lentil soup (it has been the same for years now, don’t ask me why but it is one of life’s pleasures to me!). This is around 8pm and this is my last meal of the day.

 

Throughout the day I watch out for my blood glucose, I do not go anywhere near anything with a high glycemic index, because I do not want my insulin to be all over the place, which will actually disturb the making of the T3 and T4 hormones. I also stopped consuming caffeine, gluten, processed goods, and sugar years ago (except for the caffeine, I just stopped last year). I use fluoride-free toothpaste, I completely avoid soy and soy products -enemy number one to the Thyroid gland- I use cast iron cookware, I use lots of cinnamon and ginger in my diet, and I try to get an adequate amount of vitamin B, D, C and E in my diet.

 

I am in bed by 10pm, where I will usually read until I fall asleep.  Sleep is very important to me, so I always make sure I sleep 7 hours every night. I wake up every morning fresh and ready for the new adventures the new day is bringing and we do it all over again!

 

I sometimes feel that I am always on the go, and never get a chance to even feel tired. My forever goal is to get the optimum energy my body (and brain) can offer, and having a hypo-thyroid can temper with that same goal, so having a healthy diet is crucial to me. Exercising is the second thing I can never live without, because it is what keeps me sane and whole. It is also a way to distress and get into that relaxation zone that benefits the body enormously. Then comes sleep, which is vital!

 

I really hope the world takes Hypothyroidism more seriously as about one billion people (mostly women) are diagnosed with a hypo-thyroid. This is a disease that will take over your life and shows you just how frail and vulnerable you are in so many ways!

 

Ouiam